Friday, March 18, 2011

The Spring Cardigan


I read a post the other day on someone's blog about "uniforms" - you know, your comfort clothes, the outfit combo you can throw on without really thinking about it, sometimes you don't even realize you do it. Well here's mine - jeans, t-shirt or tank, a cardigan (of course), and a fun necklace and earrings - 99% of the time this is what you will find me in. So with warmer weather approaching, I needed some lighter weight cardigans for my "uniform" - and the spring cardi was born (you could also probably call this a shrug)

The first version of this cardigan was made out of a blue jersey sheet that I had on hand. For the sake of this tutorial, I'm going to show you both the blue jersey version and the floral version which was made from a light weight mystery (probably polyester) thrift store fabric, although I think the floral version turned out better. It drapes better, fits better, and was more the look I was going for. **A couple of notes - when reading through this tutorial all measurements are for the blue jersey version with measurements for the floral version given in parentheses, and also these measurements are something you will probably want to play around with a bit depending on your individual sizing and the fabric you are using. Because it is made from 1 piece of fabric it is fairly easy to cut it a little bigger, check sizing, and cut down if needed.**

Ok, this seems a little complicated and it's a little hard to explain but in reality it is really, really easy to make - it's all 1 piece, 2 little seams, and you're good to go. You will need a piece of non-fraying fabric (such as jersey or some polyesters) that measures at least 34 inches by 30 inches (50 inches). Fold your fabric in half lengthwise, then widthwise. You're going to cut out a shape like this, cutting along the top line and side curved line, through all 4 layers:



Here are my pieces, still folded:



When you unfold it, it should look kind of like this:



Fold in half, across the concave side, right sides together.


Place a pin 4 inches (10 inches) up from the cut edge, and pin edges together up to that point and sew. **April 2011 - edited to add - do this on the opposite side as well - this will create your 2 armholes**:



Turn right side out and it is ready to wear. This was my blue version:

not bad for a first try . . .



. . . but I like this one a lot better!

27 comments:

  1. This is too cute! I have the same uniform except instead of a cardigan I'm usually in a fleece. I would much rather wear something nicer though, like what you made. Thanks for the tutorial!

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  2. I love the original fabric and the pattern! I wear a lot of cardi's, so I might have to try this one out!

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  3. Love them! The flowered one looks like something that Anthropologue would charge $100 for.

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  4. I love fabric finds like that! Beautiful :) Will add to my list!

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  5. so beautiful!
    abranconier.blogspot.com

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  6. Great idea! I love it in the floral fabric.

    Rachel @ Maybe Matilda

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  7. This is really cute, but I'm a little confused. In the picture where you sew the 4" seam, it looks like you're sewing on the concave cut line, but in the picture above where you fold, it looks like you would be folding the fabric with the curved edges. Perhaps you turned the fabric after folding and then took the pic?

    So does the side with the outward curves end up as the neck and hem, or are those the sides for the armholes? I've seen this done with just a rectangle, but never with the curves and I just can't quite figure it out.

    Thanks!

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  8. Jan - sorry if this is a little confusing. It was hard to explain the process. But yes, you are sewing along the concave line. The outward curves (convex) end up as your neckline and hem. (It does look like I may have turned the fabric when I took the picture - in the first pic the concave side is at the top and in the second it is on the right hand side). Please let me know if you have more questions. It's such a simple project but just not easy to explain.

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  9. thanks! This is so cute (and brilliant =)).

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  10. Very cute. This would be something nice to wear casually, but also to work!

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  11. Thank you, twobutterflies! That is what I thought you meant, but just wanted to make sure. I understand what you mean about it being simple, yet hard to explain, you did a great job.

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  12. This looks so very cute. I am wondering if you could show us a picture of it on you. I am wondering how it looks around the arm area when it is on.

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  13. Love your uniform!! Your instructions are clear enough that I think I could whip one or two up too! Thanks for sharing!!

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  14. Great job on figuring out the folded technique this. Very versatile piece. (Found you via Craft Gossip).

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  15. this is just what I am looking for to make to go over a sundress for a wedding.

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  16. I absolutely LOVE this. Please link it up to my link party. Great job. What a cute and fun "uniform" that you could easily change everyday!
    Amy
    @ SistersoftheWildWest.blogspot.com

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  17. Oh I love this! I want to use some of my Little Folks Voile for this but I haven't quite figured it out so am making prototypes first..... I never did well with spatial concepts so I'm working it over and over.... Will re-read the comments and your response above.... Thanks for this grea tutorial!

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  18. SO incredibly cute! i am curious if you could give any direction on how you came up with the size to cut. did u measure certain areas (ie-shoulder width, or back lenght) and add inches? or just guess? :) i would love to make a few of these for my little girls to wear during the summer to church (sometimes it's a little chilly inside, but a full sweater is not needed)
    thanks for sharing.
    i also LOVE your fleece embellishment! thinking of trying that on some plain tshirts for me and my girls.

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  19. Regarding how I came up with the sizing, I just kind of guessed. The first one (the blue one) didn't hang exactly like I wanted so I made some adjustments and tried again - total trial and error.

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  20. Maybe a stupid question - in the directions it sounds like you only do one hem, but (obviously?) you need two, one for each arm hole? Then you kind of end up with a tube, if you put the curved edges together, or at least that's what I'm picturing.

    I'm trying to make one of these of my own :-) I really love this simple pattern, once I can get my head wrapped around this!

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  21. Stella - you are correct, you need to sew that hem twice - one for each armhole. I'll edit the pattern to mention that. Thanks. I'd love to see yours when it's finished!

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  22. I love this!
    I'm launching my first linky party next tuesday. It's for projects that cost less than $10 and take less than 20-30 minutes. Would you consider linking up with me on my first linky party endeavor? Thanks!
    http://sweetfloweret.blogspot.com
    Tina

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  23. Thank you for linking up to my 20 minute tuesday party ;)
    i'm GIVING FIFTY button pony tailers to the first 50 who follow my blog AND like me on FB. I need an email with your address too if you have done both.
    Hope you play along and get a free pony tailer!

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  24. very wonderful,i might be able to follow pattern if i follow slowly and study one step at a time,thank you i will try this because i love it

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  25. Thank you for sharing this information
    www.huafu.org

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